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Access control allow origin iis

Enable CORS for specific domains in IIS using URL Rewrite

Enabling CORS for specific domains in IIS using URL Rewrite

If you are writing modern applications one thing that is becoming more and more common is the use of Cross-Origin Resource Sharing otherwise known as CORS. If you want to learn all the details about it you can go to: http://www.w3.org/TR/cors/.

A super simplification of the flow for the purpose of this article is that the client (like a browser) sends the request and includes a header “Origin” including the origin of the request. The server then can make decisions depending on the origin and in response add a Access-Control-Allow-Origin header that specifies a list of origins, or a “*” to indicate that it is allowed.

Now the problem is when you already have an application and cannot modify the code (or do not want to do it), is there a way to enable CORS and do the more advanced handling such as responding the Access-Control-Allow-Origin with the Origin header in the incoming request such as in the case when Access-Control-Allow-Credentials is required?

Turns out using URL Rewrite you can very easily achieve that without writing a single line of code, and best of all works with all version of IIS 7 and above.

At a high level the steps required are:

  1. Add a URL Rewrite Inbound Rule to capture the Origin header and set it in a Server Variable (this will require adding a Server Variable to the list of allowed sever variables for security reasons)
  2. Add a URL Rewrite Outbound Rule to add a Access-Control-Allow-Origin header with the server variable set above.
  3. For completeness here we will do that based on a URL Rewrite Map that will have a list of allowed origins

1. Add a URL Rewrite Inbound Rule to capture the Origin header

  1. Run IIS Manager
  2. Navigate to your site and click URL Rewrite
  3. Click Add Rule..
  4. Enter the following values:
    1. Name: Capture Origin Header
    2. Matches the pattern: .*
    3. Add a condition to capture the header:
      1. Condition Input:
      2. Pattern: .+
    4. Set it as a server variable
      1. server variable name: CAPTURED_ORIGIN
      2. value:
    5. Action Type: None

This rule in your web.config will look like as below:

It is basically matching every URL (regardless if static content, dynamic, etc), and will look for the Origin header (notice that URL Rewrite uses the convention of prefixing by HTTP_ for headers), if it has an value then it will set a server variable called CAPTURED_ORIGIN so we can later refer to it in the response to set a header.

Allowing the CAPTURED_ORIGIN Server Variable

For security reasons URL Rewrite will not let you overwrite headers and server variables at will since that could mean potentially a security risk, where someone could overwrite authentication headers or the like. For that reason by default it will not let you change any. You have to add every header or server-variable to a list of allowed headers to be overridden.

  1. Back in URL Rewrite at the site level click the “View Server Variables” link in the Manage Server Variables section.
  2. Add one for CAPTURED_ORIGIN and since we are here add one for RESPONSE_Access-Control-Allow-Origin

Note that this change is made in ApplicationHost.config since that section is locked by default to allow administrators/IT owners to have control over which headers are allowed. You could unlock the section if you wanted to add that along in your web.config.

Note that the convention to set response headers is to prefix them with RESPONSE_.

2. Add a URL Rewrite Outbound Rule to add a Access-Control-Allow-Origin

Now that we have captured the Origin header and have specified that it is ok to override the Access-Control-Allow-Origin, lets write a Map where we’ll keep the list of origins that we want to allow and rewrite for those.

First lets add the RewriteMap

  1. Back in URL Rewrite at the site level click the View Rewrite Maps.
  2. Add a new map called AllowedOrigins and add all the origins you want to allow, for example: add a name: foo.com and value foo.com. The value will be the value that will be set in the header.

Now add an Outbound Rule

  1. Set it to match a server variable, RESPONSE_Access-Control-Allow-Origin
  2. Set it to: Does not match the pattern: .+
  3. Add a condition:
    1. Input: >
    2. Pattern: .+
  4. Set the action to Rewrite, Value:

The complete web.config file looks like:

Summary:

The rules above will basically do the following:

  1. Inspect all the requests, it checks to see if it has an Origin header
    1. if it does have a header then it will set it to the server variable CAPTURED_ORIGIN
    2. if it does not then nothing is done
  2. In the outbound when the response is about to be sent, then it will check to see if the Access-Control-Allow-Origin header is empty, then
    1. it will lookup the value of the CAPTURED_ORIGIN server variable in the map AllowedOrigins, and if there is a key that matches, then it will capture the value of that.
    2. Then it will set the Access-Control-Origin header to that value

You can hopefully realize how powerfull the combination of Inbound rules and Outbound rules are in URL Rewrite and how you could extend the sample above to handle scenarios to request credentials or not.

CORS; How To Set HTTP Response Header on IIS Windows Server 2012 R2 to Access-Control-Allow-Origin

When attempting to make an AJAX call are you getting the following error?

XMLHttpRequest cannot load (then some path to the remote site). No ‘Access-Control-Allow-Origin’ header is present on the requested resource. Origin ‘http://yourAjaxCallingSite.com’ is therefore not allowed access.

This means the Server hosting the resource is not set up to be CORS compliant.

If you are able to administer the server and if that server happens to be an IIS Windows Server 2012 R2, then this post is for you.

Cross-origin resource sharing (CORS) solves the issue that prevents sharing web services or resources between sites on different servers. Here is a link if you want to read more Cross-origin_resource_sharing. CORS sets up a mean by which a browser and server can safely determine whether or not to allow cross-origin requests. This permits more functionality and greater freedom than requests restricted to same-origin. At the same time, it is secure – not simply allowing every cross-origin request. In fact this is a recommended standard of the W3C.

To get our IIS Windows Server site to be CORS compliant (see How CORS works), we will need to add a CORS compliant HTTP Response header.

How To Add a CORS compliant HTTP Response Header to IIS Windows Server 2012 R2

In our case we will add the ‘Access-Control-Allow-Origin’ HTTP Response header.

  1. On the Windows server select the Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager application from the icons in the bottom bar or click the Windows icon and select “Server Manager”
  2. Navigate to the website you need to edit the response headers for.
  3. From the list or Icons related to the site you are editing, select “HTTP Response Headers”.
  4. After it opens look for “HTTP Response Headers”. It will say say, “Use this feature to configure HTTP headers that are added to the responses from the Web server.”
  5. Click “Add”
    A dialog box will open. For name enter “Access-Control-Allow-Origin” and for Value enter an asterisk. Or, if want to restrict the interactions to queries from a particular site, then enter that domain.
  6. Then click the OK button.

That’s it! You’re done.

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2 thoughts on “ CORS; How To Set HTTP Response Header on IIS Windows Server 2012 R2 to Access-Control-Allow-Origin ”

Please clarify: “Server hosting the resource”
Does this refer to the the remote API source server OR the website calling the remote API source server?

Which server needs the Access-Control-Allow-Origin Header? The server hosting the web service, or the website that is trying to ajax to the web service?

Yes, “Server hosting the resource” is the remote API source server. This is also the server that needs the Access-Control-Allow-Origin Header. Hope that helps.

Enable CORS for specific domains in IIS using URL Rewrite

Enabling CORS for specific domains in IIS using URL Rewrite

If you are writing modern applications one thing that is becoming more and more common is the use of Cross-Origin Resource Sharing otherwise known as CORS. If you want to learn all the details about it you can go to: http://www.w3.org/TR/cors/.

A super simplification of the flow for the purpose of this article is that the client (like a browser) sends the request and includes a header “Origin” including the origin of the request. The server then can make decisions depending on the origin and in response add a Access-Control-Allow-Origin header that specifies a list of origins, or a “*” to indicate that it is allowed.

Now the problem is when you already have an application and cannot modify the code (or do not want to do it), is there a way to enable CORS and do the more advanced handling such as responding the Access-Control-Allow-Origin with the Origin header in the incoming request such as in the case when Access-Control-Allow-Credentials is required?

Turns out using URL Rewrite you can very easily achieve that without writing a single line of code, and best of all works with all version of IIS 7 and above.

At a high level the steps required are:

  1. Add a URL Rewrite Inbound Rule to capture the Origin header and set it in a Server Variable (this will require adding a Server Variable to the list of allowed sever variables for security reasons)
  2. Add a URL Rewrite Outbound Rule to add a Access-Control-Allow-Origin header with the server variable set above.
  3. For completeness here we will do that based on a URL Rewrite Map that will have a list of allowed origins

1. Add a URL Rewrite Inbound Rule to capture the Origin header

  1. Run IIS Manager
  2. Navigate to your site and click URL Rewrite
  3. Click Add Rule..
  4. Enter the following values:
    1. Name: Capture Origin Header
    2. Matches the pattern: .*
    3. Add a condition to capture the header:
      1. Condition Input:
      2. Pattern: .+
    4. Set it as a server variable
      1. server variable name: CAPTURED_ORIGIN
      2. value:
    5. Action Type: None

This rule in your web.config will look like as below:

It is basically matching every URL (regardless if static content, dynamic, etc), and will look for the Origin header (notice that URL Rewrite uses the convention of prefixing by HTTP_ for headers), if it has an value then it will set a server variable called CAPTURED_ORIGIN so we can later refer to it in the response to set a header.

Allowing the CAPTURED_ORIGIN Server Variable

For security reasons URL Rewrite will not let you overwrite headers and server variables at will since that could mean potentially a security risk, where someone could overwrite authentication headers or the like. For that reason by default it will not let you change any. You have to add every header or server-variable to a list of allowed headers to be overridden.

  1. Back in URL Rewrite at the site level click the “View Server Variables” link in the Manage Server Variables section.
  2. Add one for CAPTURED_ORIGIN and since we are here add one for RESPONSE_Access-Control-Allow-Origin

Note that this change is made in ApplicationHost.config since that section is locked by default to allow administrators/IT owners to have control over which headers are allowed. You could unlock the section if you wanted to add that along in your web.config.

Note that the convention to set response headers is to prefix them with RESPONSE_.

2. Add a URL Rewrite Outbound Rule to add a Access-Control-Allow-Origin

Now that we have captured the Origin header and have specified that it is ok to override the Access-Control-Allow-Origin, lets write a Map where we’ll keep the list of origins that we want to allow and rewrite for those.

First lets add the RewriteMap

  1. Back in URL Rewrite at the site level click the View Rewrite Maps.
  2. Add a new map called AllowedOrigins and add all the origins you want to allow, for example: add a name: foo.com and value foo.com. The value will be the value that will be set in the header.

Now add an Outbound Rule

  1. Set it to match a server variable, RESPONSE_Access-Control-Allow-Origin
  2. Set it to: Does not match the pattern: .+
  3. Add a condition:
    1. Input: >
    2. Pattern: .+
  4. Set the action to Rewrite, Value:

The complete web.config file looks like:

Summary:

The rules above will basically do the following:

  1. Inspect all the requests, it checks to see if it has an Origin header
    1. if it does have a header then it will set it to the server variable CAPTURED_ORIGIN
    2. if it does not then nothing is done
  2. In the outbound when the response is about to be sent, then it will check to see if the Access-Control-Allow-Origin header is empty, then
    1. it will lookup the value of the CAPTURED_ORIGIN server variable in the map AllowedOrigins, and if there is a key that matches, then it will capture the value of that.
    2. Then it will set the Access-Control-Origin header to that value

You can hopefully realize how powerfull the combination of Inbound rules and Outbound rules are in URL Rewrite and how you could extend the sample above to handle scenarios to request credentials or not.

CORS policy «Access-Control-Allow-Origin» IIS

I have angular , Entity Framework and MS SQL server. I need to have Backend set on MS IIS because I need to have domain authentication. Unluckily I still get problems with CORS.

When I have in my web.config file:

I get in the browser: «has been blocked by CORS policy: The ‘Access-Control-Allow-Origin’ header has a value ‘http://localhost’ that is not equal to the supplied origin»

When I change it to:

I get: «has been blocked by CORS policy: The value of the ‘Access-Control-Allow-Origin’ header in the response must not be the wildcard ‘*’ when the request’s credentials mode is ‘include’. The credentials mode of requests initiated by the XMLHttpRequest is controlled by the withCredentials attribute.»

Any idea what should I change?

Error in browser: «has been blocked by CORS policy: The ‘Access-Control-Allow-Origin’ header contains the invalid value ‘true’.»

In fiddler I can see: Security Access-Control-Allow-Origin: true

It looks like the values are not being added to given headers.

Next change: I installed CORS module for IIS and the file looks like:

The answer in browser now is: «HTTP Error 404.0 — Not Found The resource you are looking for has been removed, had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable. » Is it better now? What could be next steps?

1 answer

  • answered 2019-08-10 22:45 Christopher Peisert

If your localhost server is running on a specific port, it must be included in the Access-Control-Allow-Origin , such as http://localhost:8080 .

In the browser Developer Tools > Network check the Request headers and verify the Referer . This is the URL that should be set for Access-Control-Allow-Origin .

Developer Tools > Network

Configuration

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node.js — the — webapi c# access control allow origin

CORS в IIS с учетными данными и подстановочными знаками в Access-Control-Allow-Origin (2)

В вопросе не отображается код клиента, который отправляет запрос, который вызывает эту ошибку, но:

Клиентский код должен использовать XHR или API Fetch (или использовать jQuery или другую библиотеку, которая вызывает одно из них), и этот код либо устанавливает свойство XHR withCredentials в true либо вызывает конструктор запроса Fetch с объектом options, имеющим параметр credentials который должен include .

Если это так, и ответ сервера имеет заголовок Access-Control-Allow-Origin: * , ваш браузер зарегистрирует ошибку, указанную в вопросе.

Поэтому одним из решений является изменение кода клиента JavaScript, поэтому он не устанавливает withCredentials в true и не вызывает конструктор запроса Fetch с credentials: ‘include’ .

Еще одно решение состоит в том, чтобы заставить ваш серверный код взять значение заголовка запроса Origin и повторить его до значения заголовка ответа Access-Control-Allow-Origin .

Для IIS вы можете сделать это с помощью модуля URL Rewrite , добавив следующее в конфигурационный файл IIS (файл Web.config или ApplicationHost.config в %SystemDrive%inetpubwwwroot ).

Затем удалите любой другой существующий код / ​​config, устанавливающий Access-Control-Allow-Origin: * .

Примечание . Вышеупомянутая версия представляет собой модифицированную версию примерного файла конфигурации в пошаговом руководстве. Включите CORS для определенных доменов в IIS с помощью URL Rewrite .

Я унаследовал довольно простой сайт, который обслуживает данные и обрабатывает некоторые соединения сокетов. Он запускает NodeJS за IIS, используя iisnode в качестве моста. Все это отлично работает с точки зрения «обслуживать обычные страницы».

Отчасти проблема заключается в том, что фактические подключения к серверу поступают от настольных клиентов, где контент загружается через другое приложение в виде гаджета и из потенциально изменяющихся и разных частей сети, мобильных устройств и т. Д. И т. Д. неизвестное количество клиентских доменов.

Я уже установил для Access-Control-Allow origin значение *, чтобы просто открыть двери сарая, но теперь я получаю следующую ошибку в клиенте:

11: 29: 57.668 Запрос на перекрестный запрос заблокирован: политика одного и того же происхождения запрещает чтение удаленного ресурса по адресу « http: //server/socket.io/? EIO = 3 & transport = polling & t = 1486150196479-0 ». (Причина: учетные данные не поддерживаются, если заголовок CORS ‘Access-Control-Allow-Origin’ равен ‘*’). 1 (неизвестно)

Я попытался явно установить значение Access-Control-Allow-Credentials как false (а также true, а также оставить его полностью), но ни одна из моих попыток не позволила мне пройти мимо этого.

Заголовки исходного ответа выглядят так:

Кажется, я не могу разобраться после того, как просмотрел несколько сайтов и статей в CORS за последние несколько дней, почему он все еще жалуется на Credentials — и более конкретно, как мне обойти это?

ОБНОВЛЕНИЕ 2017-02-06

Клиентский код не очень увлекательный. Поскольку сервер является NodeJS за IIS, все, что я действительно делаю для этого, это реализация соединения сокета:

Это работает из одного домена.

Я также делал еще несколько копаний, основанных на комментариях sidehowbarker, которые привели меня к этой статье. Есть несколько дополнительных шагов, чтобы добавить переменные и некоторые другие вещи, чтобы заставить эту работу работать.

В моем приложенииHost.config данный раздел:

и мой web.config находится здесь:

на outboundRules В настоящее время у меня есть тип действия = строка «Переписать», потому что, когда я включаю ее, она вызывает ошибку.

Ошибочные журналы запросов не слишком полезны, они показывают следующее для предупреждения:

У меня была такая же проблема: у меня были привязки http и https на одном веб-сайте с Access-Control-Allow-Origin: *, в этом случае http-запрос завершится с ошибкой выше. вы можете создать отдельный сайт для привязки http и удалить из него заголовок Access-Control-Allow-Origin.

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